• Jon Heatherly

Free Food Gardens in Each Town

Mutual Aid for a More Just World pt. 12

Photo of Brooklyn Heights Community Garden by JM Heatherly

Garden Design by Nashville Foodscapes


Community gardens bring another solution to hunger in food deserts, a form of mutual aid most dear to us here. Any one may share space and practice how to grow food, build community through their relationships, and share the harvests.


Great spaces include churches, libraries, nursing homes, balconies, apartment grounds, rooftops, abandoned swimming pools, trailheads and more!


One would be hard-pressed to miss the obvious benefits of community gardening. Over 20 million Victory Gardens helped feed US through the second world war. In fact, they supplied 40% of domestic produce at that time.


Besides learning to grow nutritious food, you get to eat what you harvest! It is a workout at times, and you improve your well-being, physical and mental health. Furthermore, evidence shows gardening together improves social cohesion. It also helps solve food injustice - gardens in every neighborhood.


When you community garden, you seize the means to produce your own food! You know how your food was grown, and you reconnect with our Earth. Distribute your harvests among your fellow gardeners, the area neighborhood, or local shelters. More community gardening means resilience and food in bellies — oases among food deserts.


First Published at Cultured


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